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Hiking
Backpacking
Cycle Touring
Weekend Getaways
Horseback Riding
Whale Watching
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Salmon Watching
Cave Exploring
River Rafting
Sea Kayaking
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Appendix: Getting There
Ramblings
Seasons in the Sun
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The Critic's Voice
" Great book. Has a little bit of everything (places to hike, kayak, day tour, etc.), super informative and practical (conditions of camp sites, pubs to go to or avoid, etc.), and has awesome factoids about local flora/fauna and Aboriginal culture on the margins. Great for anyone interested in the BC outdoors! "
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Dentalia Shells
These thin, tubular mollusks formed the currency of commerce throughout the Pacific Northwest as long as 3000 years ago. Pre-European civilization is often considered a barter economy, with, for instance, coastal tribes swapping oolichan grease directly for prized Oregon obsidian. Commodity traders, however, could rely on this wampum to close a transaction when interest in the goods was decidedly one-sided. Called hykwa in Chinook jargon, dentalia shells possessed all the necessary attributes of money, being portable, recognizable and durable but rare and desirable enough to foster trade. Being available in a variety of sizes, the tusk-like shells were even divisible into small change. Professional traders are known to have tattooed measuring lines on their forearms as a handy calculator of individual shell values. Only a handful of groups, including the Nuu-chah-nulth in the vicinity of Tofino, possessed dentalia in quantities sufficient enough to make them wealthy. Harvesting the deep water mollusks was no easy undertaking however. From a dugout canoe a long, broom-like apparatus was thrust straight down into the muddy sea bottom then retrieved. With any luck a shell or two would be trapped amongst the stiff twigs at the end of the handle. Dentalia were also ostentatiously displayed as symbols of wealth and power in the form of body adornments. Perhaps most recognizable are the breast plates invariably worn by cheesy Hollywood Indians.
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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08
Feb
2007
argaiv1960
Galiano Island Hiking Trails - Bluffs Park E-mail
(10 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   
Level: Easy
Distance: 8 km
Time: 2 h
Elevation Change: 180 m
Season: Year Round
Map: 92 B/14
Access: At the head of Whaler Bay about two km from the Sturdies Bay ferry terminal you'll find the trailhead on the left side of the road.

An old overgrown logging road here leads to 130 hectare Bluffs Park. Within a few minutes the trail branches to the left. Though unmarked, this is the route to Bluffs Park. The newer-looking main trail parallels Sturdies Bay Road as far as the 2 grocery stores on Georgeson Bay Road. Follow the forested trail 2 km to reach Bluff Road. A few minutes up the road you'll find the parking area from which a trail leads to the summit. The view overlooks Active Pass and Navy Channel with North Pender Island in the distance on the right. Mayne Island is across the channel on the left. Bluffs Park was created in 1948, made possible by a generous land donation by the Belgian farming family who settled the land. To loop back to the ferry terminal return via Bluff Road to Burrill Road (2 km) then on to Sturdies Bay Road (2 km). The ferry terminal is just a kilometre down the hill.

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