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Bull Kelp
Besides being edible, and delicious at that, this gigantic algae had a number of important technological uses for coastal First Nations. The stalks were spliced together to make fishing lines hundreds of metres long. Though brittle when dried the lines could be thus stored indefinitely. Soaking before use would resore pliability and strength suited to hauling halibut from the depths. The hollow stalks could be employed as water conduits as well. Bulb and wide upper stalk were employed in the kitchen as squeeze tubes and storage containers for edible oils. Salves and ointments made of deer fat and other ingredients could be poured in the bulbs as well. Upon hardening the kelp was peeled away leaving a "cake" of skin cream or sun screen
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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08
Feb
2007
argaiv1174
San Juan Islands-Shaw Island E-mail
(6 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   
Terrain: Flat
Traffic: Light
Season: Year Round
Distance: 22 km
Access: See section intro, Getting to The San Juan Islands.

At 20 square kilometres, Shaw Island is the smallest, least developed of the San Juans. A general store, a historical society museum and a county campsite comprise the amenities on Shaw Island. The cycling circuit is a mere 22 km of well-paved country roads from which you'll glimpse virgin stands of timber, historic farms and an active commercial salmon fishery. You may even want to scout the beach for agates at South Beach County Park [(206) 468-2580.]

Arrive early at Shaw Landing and head directly for the only campsite on the island. If in need of provisions pause for a moment after disembarking from the ferry. The general store at Shaw Landing is the only place on the island where groceries can be procured. Be forewarned that, since the Little Portion store is operated by a group of Franciscan nuns, it remains closed on Sundays.

To reach the park follow the road around the head of Blind Bay, turning left upon reaching Squaw Bay Road. South Beach County Park, about a kilometre further on, sadly has just 12 tents sites. If you find it full you may wish to do a quick circuit of the island then catch the ferry onward to Orcas Island in the afternoon. Those who crave a certain amount of solitude far from the hurly burly of other more tourist-infested campgrounds will find South Beach County Park a sheer delight however. The south-facing beach, a crescent of fine sand and gravel nearly a kilometre long, winds around the peninsula along the east side of Indian Cove and into Squaw Bay. Enjoy taking long walks, beachcombing and observing the abundant shore birds here as the rest of the foreshore of Shaw Island is off-limits due to the tyranny American real estate law. The shore at the western end of the island is a nature preserve.

Cyclists are limited to exploring the rural nature of inland Shaw Island rather than the maritime features ringing it. From South Beach County Park continue along Squaw Bay Road making a right at Hoffman Cove Road. At the island's principal intersection you'll find the Little Red Schoolhouse which still operates as a one-room school for the children of Shaw Island's 163 year-round residents. Kitty-corner to the historic school a log cabin serves as the island's museum. Visitors are welcome every Monday and Saturday.

Continue peddling north along the Ben Nevis Loop Road turning right where it rejoins Blind Bay Road. If time allows follow Neck Point Road 5 km out and back for more of Shaw Island's pleasant rural landscape. If unable to camp over on Shaw Island follow Blind Bay Road all the way back to the ferry landing. A short detour along Smugglers Cove Road reveals more of the island's foreshore. Smuggling, incidentally, has a long history throughout the San Juan Islands. A myriad of islands and heavy maritime traffic have made eluding interdiction easy. Illegal immigrants from China, wool, whisky and, to this day, British Columbia's fine hemp products, have all found their way into the States from its neighbour to the north via these waters.

bearpaw

 

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