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Salal
Though not a popular trail-side snack in modern times, salal berries are not only edible, they are quite tasty. Perhaps the "hairiness" of the berries or the grainy texture imparted by their many, tiny seeds is a turnoff to jaded modern palettes. Being plentiful throughout the coast, salal berries were an important component of pre-European diets hereabouts. Aboriginal groups generally consumed salal berries directly from the bush or processed them into a kind of fruit leather for storage. These cakes were then reconstituted with water and served mixed with the omnipresent oolichan grease. An acquired taste, no doubt. The deep purple colouring of the berries found use in dying bakets. Salal berries are presently used primarily in jams and pies. The bright, leathery foliage is commercially harvested for use in floral displays world-wide.
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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07
Feb
2007
argaiv1960
Baden-Powell Centennial Trail E-mail
(21 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   
Introduction
A project initiated by the Boy Scouts and Girl Guides, the Baden-Powell Centennial Trail was constructed in 1971 to commemorate British Columbia's first 100 years as a province. This 41.7-km trail stretches from Horseshoe Bay in the west, across the south-facing slopes of the North Shore Mountains to Deep Cove in the east.

Most of the trails on Canada's rugged west coast have a lot of vertical mixed in with their horizontal. This trail is no exception. Over the course of the Baden-Powell Centennial Trail you can expect to encounter nearly 5 km of elevation change. You'll climb 2438 metres and lose slightly more, 2530 metres, on the downside. Nearly half of your elevation gain will be in the first section alone.

The trail is readily accessible at many points along its length using public transportation and is best undertaken over a number of days. The Baden-Powell Trail is especially popular in the springtime for pre-season conditioning while most hiking routes in the province of are still under snow. The route cuts across a large number of administrative areas. For that reason you will find great variety in the quality of maintenance and signage along the way. Though closed to mountain bikes expect to encounter cyclists at any point on the trail. Keep in mind that if you choose to complete any sections of the trail in the opposite direction from those described below your time could vary considerably depending on the slope.

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Copyright © 2007 Brian Grover. Content Distribution is Prohibited
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