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Bull Kelp
Besides being edible, and delicious at that, this gigantic algae had a number of important technological uses for coastal First Nations. The stalks were spliced together to make fishing lines hundreds of metres long. Though brittle when dried the lines could be thus stored indefinitely. Soaking before use would resore pliability and strength suited to hauling halibut from the depths. The hollow stalks could be employed as water conduits as well. Bulb and wide upper stalk were employed in the kitchen as squeeze tubes and storage containers for edible oils. Salves and ointments made of deer fat and other ingredients could be poured in the bulbs as well. Upon hardening the kelp was peeled away leaving a "cake" of skin cream or sun screen
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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07
Feb
2007
argaiv1572
Brew Lake E-mail
(5 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   

Level: Difficult
Distance: 12 km r/t
Time: 7 h r/t
Elevation Change: 1036 m
Map: Brandywine 92J/3
Season: July to Oct
Access: See Getting to Whistler. Brew Lake must be accessed via the CNR [Formerly BC Railway] right-of-way. Take the bus as far as Brandywine Falls Provincial Park.

Before beginning your hike in earnest be sure to take a moment to check out Brandywine Falls. Brandywine Creek tumbles 66 metres down into a gorge of its own creation, filling the air with a fine cloud of mist. Return to the railway tracks and follow them west towards the Sea to Sky Highway. The rail bed turns abruptly south on the other side of Highway 99, continuing in a straight line for 1.8 km before making another sharp westward turn. Continue along the tracks until just 200 metres before this latter turn where you will find the well-marked trail to Brew Lake and beyond. At all times when following the railway right-of-way remain alert to the approach of freight and passenger trains as well as the fire-suppression crews which follow them.

The elevation gain is unrelenting, rising first over treed slopes then steeper, switching back and forth over rocky terrain. Pause from time to time to not only catch your breath but take in the views across the valley towards Garibaldi Provincial Park. By the time you have dropped down through alpine meadows to the shores of Brew Lake you will have climbed 1036 metres over six kilometres. Small rainbow trout are abundant in Brew Lake. The ambitious could set up a base camp at the lakeside from which to explore the open alpine ridges thereabouts. The route to Brew Mountain continues for 1.6 additional kilometres with a further elevation gain of 280 metres.

bearpaw

 

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