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Fireweed
Gashes in the forest caused by fire, blowdown or human intrusion are quickly filled in by pioneer species such as fireweed or salal. Quick growing red alder and maple soon take over, being themselves supplanted in turn by Douglas fir once soil has stabilized. Eventually shade tolerant climax species such as western red cedar and western hemlock will come to dominate. The whole process can take centuries if not millennia. Immature fireweed plants can be cooked whole like broccoli while the young leaves can be used as salad greens. Fireweed is high in both beta-carotene and vitamin C. During pre-contact times fireweed seed fluffs found utility as pillow stuffing.
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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07
Feb
2007
argaiv1804
Buntzen Lake: Dilly Dally Loop E-mail
(13 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   
Access: Click for details on Getting to Buntzen Lake.
Level: Difficult
Distance: 25 km
Time: 11 hr
Elevation Change: 1050 m
Season: July - October
Map: 92 G/7
Multiple-Use: Open to Mountain Bikes and Hikers Only

You won't want to dilly dally on the Dilly Dally trail. This route is a continuation of the previous two hikes and is only recommended for the most experienced hikers. Instead of following Trout Creek down to Swan Falls and the valley bottom you'll want to continue along Eagle Ridge to a small prominence locally known as Dilly Dally Peak. After slogging uphill most of the day you'll finally begin losing altitude quickly after passing the peak.

Soon the footpath will become an old, overgrown logging road. Needless to say the landscape still bears the scars of unenlightened logging practices. On the plus side however this route provides a number of vantage points overlooking Indian Arm. Croker Lookout in particular offers unimpeded views of the inlet below. Like the previous hike this route will eventually merge into Powerhouse Road which will take you back to South Beach where you started.

bearpaw

 

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