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Stinging Needles
Roll in a patch of stinging nettle and you'll think it's a spelling mistake. Nettle's stinging needles, as whispy as whiskers, are hollow and filled with formic acid which can cause burning, even blistering. Though aboriginal medicinal uses were various the principle technological use was as a source of hemp-like fiber for making thread and string. Stalks were picked late in the year when prickles had largely dropped off. Fibers were separated by rubbing or beating and then spun into thin threads. Those in turn could be braided to form thicker, stronger twine for weaving fine cloth, making fish nets and fishing line and, rarely, string bikinis.
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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06
Feb
2007
argaiv1886
Buntzen Lake: Lindsay Lake Loop E-mail
(11 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   
Access: Click for details on Getting to Buntzen Lake.
Level: Challenging
Distance: 15 km
Time: 7 hr
Elevation Change: 1020 m
Season: June - October
Map: 92 G/7
Multiple-Use: Open to Mountain Bikes and Hikers Only

Popular Lindsay Lake Loop follows Buntzen Creek up to Eagle Ridge and along the ridgeline to Lindsay Lake. As you reach high ground you'll come to a fork in the trail called El Paso.

Things are looking up: Century old red cedar stumps, many hosting a new generation, bear the scars of springboard logging throughout the Buntzen Lake area. This shot was taken from inside a giant hollow stump.
Hollow Stump

Take the left fork through old-growth forest past five different westward facing viewpoints. At Lindsay Lake the trail loops back following a different route through a sprinkling of mountain tarns. At El Paso once again you'll regain the main route back to the park.

bearpaw

 

Comments 

 
0 #2 linda 2010-11-04 00:32
I liked this article very much. I think that you and I may have the same interest.
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+2 #1 Guest 2009-10-22 15:29
very nice - did it today (Oct 22, 2009) in misty conditions and saw a family of deer near a stream just south of a lookout called "west point". Very magic. Lake district trails starting to flood. very wet. 6 hours exactly.
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