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Salal
Though not a popular trail-side snack in modern times, salal berries are not only edible, they are quite tasty. Perhaps the "hairiness" of the berries or the grainy texture imparted by their many, tiny seeds is a turnoff to jaded modern palettes. Being plentiful throughout the coast, salal berries were an important component of pre-European diets hereabouts. Aboriginal groups generally consumed salal berries directly from the bush or processed them into a kind of fruit leather for storage. These cakes were then reconstituted with water and served mixed with the omnipresent oolichan grease. An acquired taste, no doubt. The deep purple colouring of the berries found use in dying bakets. Salal berries are presently used primarily in jams and pies. The bright, leathery foliage is commercially harvested for use in floral displays world-wide.
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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07
Feb
2007
argaiv1791
Lynn Peak E-mail
(11 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   
Access: Getting to Lynn Headwaters
Level: Demanding
Distance: 9½ km r/t
Time: 4 h
Elevation Change: 760 m
Season: May to Nov
Map: Vancouver N 92/G6

For access to Lynn Peak follow the gravel road to the right from the information board, turning abruptly left on to Lynn Loop Trail after 10 minutes or so.

This pleasant forest footpath branches after another 20 minutes. The right fork to 825-metre Lynn Peak is well marked, sloping upwards gently enough at first. Soon however you'll begin mounting a series of switchbacks that zig and zag and zig again for 45 minutes up to a small south-facing break in the trees. Linger not, however, as the best is yet to come.

Deep Dusk: Not easy to see the forest for the trees as these three crowns poke out of the shadows, catching a few final rays of the evening sun.
Picture of hemlock crowns poking out of the shadows at sunset.

Continue climbing at a more relaxed pace for another 30 minutes and an opening known as the Blimp Lookout reveals views to the east of Mount Seymour. Catch your breath here but save your lunch as a further 30 minutes of climbing will put you on top where you may wish to linger, taking in the panorama encompassing Mount Elsay and Mount Seymour to the east and, on a clear day, Mt. Baker, that massive volcano to the south east in Washington state. When you have had enough of unsurpassed scenery and fresh air retrace your steps back down to the trailhead.

bearpaw

 

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