Main Menu
HomeAbout BC Car-FreeWhere to Buy BC Car-Free
Table of Contents
Hiking
Backpacking
Cycle Touring
Weekend Getaways
Horseback Riding
Whale Watching
Bird Watching
Salmon Watching
Cave Exploring
River Rafting
Sea Kayaking
Canoeing
Appendix: Getting There
Ramblings
Seasons in the Sun
About the Author
The Critic's Voice
" ...here is a wonderful collection of 94 outdoor adventures you can enjoy using public transportation. "
Common Ground Magazine: the Common Reader
Sidebar
Image
Bull Kelp
Besides being edible, and delicious at that, this gigantic algae had a number of important technological uses for coastal First Nations. The stalks were spliced together to make fishing lines hundreds of metres long. Though brittle when dried the lines could be thus stored indefinitely. Soaking before use would resore pliability and strength suited to hauling halibut from the depths. The hollow stalks could be employed as water conduits as well. Bulb and wide upper stalk were employed in the kitchen as squeeze tubes and storage containers for edible oils. Salves and ointments made of deer fat and other ingredients could be poured in the bulbs as well. Upon hardening the kelp was peeled away leaving a "cake" of skin cream or sun screen
Illustration by Manami Kimura
Vote Now
Would you be interested in an E-Book Version of BC Car-Free for iPad, iPhone & PC
FacebookMySpaceTwitterDiggDeliciousStumbleuponGoogle BookmarksRedditNewsvineTechnoratiLinkedinMixxRSS FeedPinterest
07
Feb
2007
argaiv1791
Norvan Falls E-mail
(8 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   
Access: Getting to Lynn Headwaters
Level: Moderate
Distance: 14 km r/t
Time: 6 h
Elevation Change: 230 m
Map: 92 G/6
Season: April to Nov

From the information board take the left fork, following a wide, flat path paralleling the creek. On the left you'll soon notice a stack of old, creosote covered wooden pipes, vestiges of North Vancouver's water supply from the 1920s to 1983. After 1.7 km the trail forks. The easiest and most interesting route lies to the left on the Cedars Mill Trail. In the underbrush to the right of the trail you'll note a miscellany of rusted artifacts dating to the early days of B.C. logging. These scraps of history are protected so refrain from pocketing a souvenir of your visit.

A Far Sketchier Route: To reach the top of Coliseum Mountain continue climbing above Norvan Falls. The trail, an additional 6 km each way, is far steeper from this point forward. Pictured here, Coliseum Mountain from the backside as seen from the Seymour River Salmon Hatchery.
Old Growth Spruce.

Except during periods of high water it is possible to catch a glimpse of a giant western red cedar, nearby. A rough trail, adjacent to the old mill site but across Lynn Creek leads steeply up the bank to the foot of a 600 years old conifer measuring 50 metres tall and 4 metres around at the base. Be sure to exercise caution when rock hopping across the waterway. Follow the rough trail back downstream to see other cedar and Douglas fir giants that the loggers overlooked.

At the end of this 2.1 km section the trail opens up on a boulder field, evidence of periodic flooding. Enjoy the sunshine at creek side here as the trail next plunges into the forest darkness following a succession of old logging roads for 2.9 km to the bridge at Norvan Creek. On the way you'll pass by another heap of historic relics. Broken bits of porcelain, a dented tea kettle and old, broken handsaws attest to the forestry operations which began here in the mid-1880s. Check out the massive stumps hereabouts and imagine the backbreaking work that must have been required to saw through one of these giants balanced on a springboard two or more metres above the forest floor.

Picturesque Norvan Falls will be found 300 metres upstream from the Norvan Creek Bridge. Whether turning back or continuing on to Grouse Mountain plan to stop here for lunch.

bearpaw

 

Banner
Copyright © 2007 Brian Grover. Content Distribution is Prohibited
The graphical images and content hosted at www.car-free.ca are viewable for private use only. All other rights - including, but not limited to, distribution, duplication, and publication by any means - are the exclusive property of Brian Grover and Whisky-Jack Communications. International law provides criminal and civil penalties for those found to be in violation.

Contact the Author for further information.

© 2017 BC Car-Free Outdoor Portal - Take a Walk on the Wild Side
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU General Public License.