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Vanilla Leaf
While modern adventurers smear their skin with toxic chemicals to keep pesky bugs at bay, natives of the Pacific Northwest took a less carcinogous approach. The fresh-squeezed juice of common Vanilla Leaf was applied to fend off mosquitos and black flies. Dried leaves, smelling faintly of vanilla, were hung in bunches about the longhouse for the same purpose. A potion of boiled Vanilla Leaf was used to wash bedding to eliminate bed bugs and mites and as a hair treatment to fend off lice and fleas. Look for Vanilla Leaf at trailside in heavy forest wherever moisture accumulates.
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07
Feb
2007
argaiv1540
Wedgemount Lake E-mail
(6 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   

Level: Difficult
Distance: 18 km r/t
Time: 8½ h r/t
Elevation Change: 1189 m
Map: Whistler 92J/2
Season: July to Sept
Access: See Getting to Whistler

Get off the bus where a blue BC Parks sign indicates Wedgemount Lake. If the bus driver doesn't know where that is tell him to look for a turnout just 11 km north of Whistler Village. From Highway 99 cross the BC Rail tracks and the Green River before turning left onto the abandoned logging road that will serve as a trail for the first 3 km. After the first two kilometres the trail becomes very steep, an attribute it will retain for the rest of the hike.

Soon after crossing the log bridge over Wedgemount Creek you'll be engulfed by a forest of old-growth conifers marking the boundary of Garibaldi Provincial Park. This is what the surrounding countryside used to look like. The forest gradually begins to thin out as altitude is gained eventually giving way to scrub and talus. This last pitch, known as the "Stairmaster," is the steepest of all but those who persevere will be richly rewarded.

Turquoise Wedgemount Lake lies at the foot of a nest of stupendous glacier-clad peaks. Garibaldi Park's highest, 2686 metre Wedge Mountain, dominates the picture. A single arm of Wedgemount Glacier reaches down to gently touch the lakeshore at its far end. Perched above the near end is the beehive-shaped shelter erected by the B.C. Mountaineering Club. For those willing to grunt up the trail with a full backpack there is also a wilderness campsite. Whether on an overnighter or an extended day trip be sure to leave enough time to explore the glacier close up. Never, of course, cross an icefield without the proper training and equipment. Extra caution should also be taken when making the return descent, especially when laden with gear.

Glacial-fed streams and lakes contain an inordinate amount of clay suspended in the water, hence the lovely bluish-green colour. Look for water trickling down from the melting snow pack for drinking instead. Due to the elevation you should even be able to find patches of the white stuff well into September.

bearpaw

 

Comments 

 
0 #2 Guess you didn't read...Brian Grover 2013-07-16 16:38
...the access section, Richard.
Quote
 
 
0 #1 RE: Wedgemount LakeRichard 2013-07-16 14:30
Get off the bus... what bus? Greyhound? Can I be sure that they'll be willing to pull over?
Quote
 

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