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Hiking
Backpacking
Cycle Touring
Weekend Getaways
Horseback Riding
Whale Watching
Bird Watching
Salmon Watching
Cave Exploring
River Rafting
Sea Kayaking
Canoeing
Appendix: Getting There
Ramblings
Seasons in the Sun
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The Critic's Voice
" ...the best thing about BC Car-Free is that it challenges the assumption that you have to have a vehicle to escape the city.| "
Briana Doyle MOMENTUM Magazine
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Nodding Onion
Packing fresh veggies along on the trail may be impractical due to weight or time considerations. Widely-available nodding onion imparts a welcomed taste of green to almost any dish except granola perhaps. Both white bulb and green stalk can be used like green onions or chives. Rubbing the crushed bulbs on exposed skin is said to keep mosquitoes, black flies and maybe even your traveling companions away. Nodding onion is commonly available throughout the province though toxic death camas looks deceptively similar to nodding onion to the uninitiated. To verify, crush a bit of the plant. Only the edible species gives off an unmistakable onion smell.
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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09
Feb
2007
argaiv1223
Sandpipers E-mail
(7 - user rating)
Written by Brian Grover   
Access: See Getting to Boundary Bay.

The passage of the snow geese coincides with the arrival of migrating western sandpipers. During April and May each spring half a million of the Alaska-bound shorebirds pass through the Fraser delta and Boundary Bay pausing for just three days to refuel on intertidal zone invertebrates.

Breeding and rearing in the glow of the midnight sun is a brief affair with most adults returning to the Lower Mainland from June to mid-July. Juveniles are abandoned after a relatively brief period of parental care and remain behind to fatten and strengthen until late in the summer, passing through the Pacific Northwest in August and September on their way to points as far south as coastal Peru and Chile.

bearpaw

 

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