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Bull Kelp
Besides being edible, and delicious at that, this gigantic algae had a number of important technological uses for coastal First Nations. The stalks were spliced together to make fishing lines hundreds of metres long. Though brittle when dried the lines could be thus stored indefinitely. Soaking before use would resore pliability and strength suited to hauling halibut from the depths. The hollow stalks could be employed as water conduits as well. Bulb and wide upper stalk were employed in the kitchen as squeeze tubes and storage containers for edible oils. Salves and ointments made of deer fat and other ingredients could be poured in the bulbs as well. Upon hardening the kelp was peeled away leaving a "cake" of skin cream or sun screen
Illustration by Manami Kimura
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About the Author: Brian Grover E-mail
(17 - user rating)
Monday, 19 February 2007 11:56

Born in the Maine backwoods and raised on both sides of the border in Oregon and British Columbia, the author kicked around the B.C. coast for a number of years after fleeing high school. Doing time in forestry, warehouses, sawmills, plywood mills and Canada Post convinced the youth that perhaps education was indeed all they said it was. While attending Malaspina College a quirk of fate landed the aspiring writer in the editor's chair of the student newspaper.

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Brian Grover on Vargas Island

Between bouts of higher education Grover worked variously as a fishing guide, a cycling guide, a newspaper reporter and a graphic artist, training which eventually landed him a job handling communications for the Outdoor Recreation Council of British Columbia. A degree in English literature and a qualification in language teaching led the author away from his beloved West Coast to four years of teaching in Japanese universities. A further year of bohemian Parisian lifestyle left him pining for the fjords of British Columbia.

Upon returning, Grover founded Explore Canada Outdoor Adventures, an adventure in itself aimed at marketing British Columbia's renewable recreation resources to overseas, principally Japanese and American, visitors. Teaching, freelance writing, photography, web design and mucking about in the British Columbia outback all figure prominently in Grover's present way of life.

 

Comments 

 
0 #2 Thanks...Brian Grover 2012-07-16 09:59
The link should be updated now.

Brian
Quote
 
 
0 #1 'Contact Us' does not workN/A 2012-07-16 02:46
Your 'Contact Us' link on http://www.car-free.ca/gallery/ i.e. http://www.car-free.ca/contact-us.html does not work.
Rgds/
Quote
 

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Copyright © 2007 Brian Grover. Content Distribution is Prohibited
The graphical images and content hosted at www.car-free.ca are viewable for private use only. All other rights - including, but not limited to, distribution, duplication, and publication by any means - are the exclusive property of Brian Grover and Whisky-Jack Communications. International law provides criminal and civil penalties for those found to be in violation.

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